Even When the Government Doesn’t Work, Artists Do: Why “Better Mus’ Come” Remains Current Tuesday 29 October, 2013

Better Mus Come Timeline Cover

The wake of the United States government shut-down, is just one instance reminding us that movies about government failings, past and present, remain “current.” Many filmmakers of political cinema have a bigger vision for their art than criticizing a broken system. These artists help audiences connect dots they didn’t recognize before and show the first-hand […]

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The wake of the United States government shut-down, is just one instance reminding us that movies about government failings, past and present, remain “current.” Many filmmakers of political cinema have a bigger vision for their art than criticizing a broken system. These artists help audiences connect dots they didn’t recognize before and show the first-hand consequences of political fall out in everyday life.

Better Mus’ Come is what our family at Parallel Film Collective calls “local=global cinema.” When asked why a locally inspired and produced film resonates with so many internationally, Better Mus’ Come director, Storm Saulter told Wax Poetics: “I was worried that maybe the film would be too specific to Jamaica for it to be appreciated, but what I’ve learned at these festivals where most of the guests are international people from outside of the Caribbean is that they are blown away. The current state of world affairs with political instability in so many places and many situations of political corruption…the film keeps getting more relevant.”

Watching a screen full of flames, a literal sea of bloodshed and hearing the strongest character scream, “No more killing, please!”, brings the audience closer to one of the most violent and politically turbulent times in Jamaican history. This award winning movie shows how warring political factions (supported by the United States and Cuba) polarized Jamaican communities and spawned the Green Bay Massacre of 1978.

Better Mus’ Come’s political critique certainly touched the Live Unchained crew (the main reason being that political issues are women’s issues). In this interview, we discuss how Storm sees Better Mus’ Come promoting a distinct Caribbean aesthetic, why he partnered with women-led African American Film Festival Releasing Movement (AFFRM), and what he wants to see the media offering more of to women cultural consumers and producers.

Part 1 -

My goal is to make universal stories that are wrapped in our colors, culture, music and people…There is an aesthetic for Caribbean film.

 

Part 2 –

I’m playing into certain stereotypes…but, at the same time trying to smash them.

 

Part 3 -

I’m looking forward to the current and next wave of women leaders…we just need a strong female perspective.

 

See the first 7 minutes of Better Mus’ Come here.

Better Mus’ come is now available on Netflix.

 

 

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