9 Tips on Starting an Art Collection #CollectorChat Monday 19 May, 2014

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What happens when a beautiful work of art captures your attention? Do you just savor it in the moment and move on? Do you not even think about owning it, assuming it’s too much? Or, do you inquire about the price, still knowing it’s still out of reach? Well, we believe, if you want to […]

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After-Colour

Photo Credit: ARC Magazine, Art by Brianna McCarthy, “After Colour”

What happens when a beautiful work of art captures your attention? Do you just savor it in the moment and move on? Do you not even think about owning it, assuming it’s too much? Or, do you inquire about the price, still knowing it’s still out of reach? Well, we believe, if you want to be an art collector, you should be an art collector. Your budget is one of many important factors to consider when making an informed purchase. From determining the best payment plan for a work of art, to researching the best dealers, our #CollectorChat will break down everything you need to know to become the collector you want. Live Unchained is proud to join the Artinista Advisory TweetUp on art collecting along with ArtSee and PetalWithMavis.

Join the TwitterChat tonight at 8:00pm EST by following #CollectorChat. You can follow and send questions to us each: @liveunchained, @theartinista, @artsee_dc and @petalwithmavis.

In the meantime, here are Sharon Burton’s 9 tips on starting an art collecting. Feel free to ask us more about these tonight.

1. Buy art because you like it, and because it moves you.

Do not buy art because it matches your sofa or your boyfriend likes it. Remember, you have to live with it, not anyone else. Buying art just for decoration may lead you to owning pieces that you no longer like.

2. Establish a Budget

How much do you want to spend on art this year?  Remember, original art tends to be more expensive than the poster stuff, so make sure you can realistically be able to spend the money on what you may like.

3.  Hire an art adviser or consultant.

This person can help you navigate the art market and find artwork that you like and is considered a good investment.

4. Visit as many art galleries as possible.

Gallery staff can be helpful guides in your art education. Ask questions about the art that interests you and specifically about the artist. Is the artist local or national? What is the medium (oil, acrylic, etc.) the artist uses to create the work?  Get on their email and mailing lists so you’ll be invited to openings and special events.

5. Visit and join your local art museums and nonprofit art centers.

Curators and seasoned collectors often give lectures on art collecting.

6.  Attend national art expos and art fairs whenever possible.

Don’t forget the local art festivals as well. Some very talented artists may live in your neighborhood.

7.  If you do know art collectors, talk to them and find out what they know and what they’ve learned about collecting.

8.  Read reviews by local and national art critics.

Keep in mind that reviews usually reflect only one person’s opinion.

9.  Read art books and subscribe to a few art magazines

Keep in mind that buying an original piece of art does not have to be a hard or scary process. Also, it should not be an expensive endeavor.

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