30 Women Creators We Love Part V #30WCR8 Friday 06 June, 2014

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We are celebrating women across the world who have used art as a tool to express their own radical truths despite the boxes, expectations or limitations other would impose on us and have us conform to. Join the exchange. Let us know how art inspires you, and who your favorite women creators are with #30WCR8. […]

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We are celebrating women across the world who have used art as a tool to express their own radical truths despite the boxes, expectations or limitations other would impose on us and have us conform to. Join the exchange. Let us know how art inspires you, and who your favorite women creators are with #30WCR8. Here are three of the five artists African & Afro-Diaspora Art Talks selected. View the full roster here.

Mequitta Ahuja

Mequitta Ahuja

Referring to her work as an Automythography, Mequitta Ahuja’s work largely revolves around the process of identity formation, the locus around which nature, culture and self invention merge. Ahuja’s work is centered around self-portraiture, and produces a female protagonist, who is born out of a sequence that involves photography, performance and drawing. Drawing from her African-American and South Asian American background, Ahuja produces an aesthetically pleasing combinations of patterns and color, steeped in cross cultural influences.

Renee Cox

renee cox

Widely known for her work ‘Yo Mama’s Last Supper’, Jamaican-American artist, Renee Cox’s art works to critique a society she views as  sexist and racist. Working with very provocative and striking imagery, Cox often uses her body, both nude and clothed, to celebrate black womanhood. She uses herself as a canvas, purposely to reclaim a ‘self-love’, while simultaneously working towards the deconstruction of stereotypes and the control of women’s bodies.

Carrie Mae Weems

Carrie Mae Weems

Employing a wide range of mediums, such as photography, fabric, audio, digital images, installation, and, most recently, video, Carrie May Weems’ work has investigated issues as family relationships, gender roles, racism, sexism and various political systems. Working from a firm historical background, Weems’ work speaks to the human condition, and in her own words, is designed to: “beautify the mess of a messy world, to heal the sick and feed the helpless; to shout bravely from the roof-tops and storm barricaded doors and voice the specifics of our historic moment.”

Written by Sharon Obuobi

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3 Comments

  • Janae says:

    So far, the only people getting a black eye out of this are Hillary and Obama. It’s an embarrassment for our country as a whole, actually.Is that really what you want? People no longer willing to share sensitive information with us, when it comes to the security of this country because we’re incapable of stopping leaks?Suffice to say, I would consider anyone who applauds this as being Un-American. This has nothing to do with “big go#1enment&v822r;. You confuse two entirely different issues. 0Was this answer helpful?


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