30 Women Creators We Love Part II #30WCR8 Tuesday 03 June, 2014

image_LU

Yesterday we introduced you to the first 5 of 30 women creators we love. In partnership with The Nu Black and African & Afro-Diaspora Art Talks (AADAT), Live Unchained continues today with 5 more amazing artists of different genres, from different parts of the world. We hope you’ll spread the word about these talented women […]

Share

Yesterday we introduced you to the first 5 of 30 women creators we love. In partnership with The Nu Black and African & Afro-Diaspora Art Talks (AADAT), Live Unchained continues today with 5 more amazing artists of different genres, from different parts of the world. We hope you’ll spread the word about these talented women that truly deserve the shine. Join us and share the women artists you love. Follow along with the hashtag #30WCR8 at on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr for more creative inspiration and conversation.

Nina Chanel Abney

“Law and Order” Nina Chanel Abney Law and Order, 2010 Acrylic on canvas 65 ½ x 74 1/4" Nina Chanel Abney has received much praise for her most recent exhibition, “I Dread to Think.” But, today we decided to share a throwback from her 2010 solo show, “Go Berserker.” Paper Magazine described her work as combining “strong feminine and masculine images infused with humor, irony, perversity, satire and fantasy.” We describe it as playful and challenging, to which she says: “[my work is] easy to swallow, hard to digest.” Having exhibited works throughout the United States and abroad, being featured in The New York Times, Essence and Glamour, people like us, are eager to see the stories her paintings have to tell because they make us better–even if we have to choke a little. View our full interview with the artist here.

Lulu Kitololo

“Wanza”

4_Painting_Portrait_Lulu_Kitololo_Wanza

Lulu Kitololo has more than 1 billion muses because the entire continent of Africa inspires her. The painter, designer and writer documents creative inspiration from across the continent at her beautifully curated blog, Afri-love. The painting depicted above, “Wanza” is an excerpt from her series “Female Relations,” which represents another topic dear to Kitololo, a woman’s spirit. Learn more about the artist’s inspiration from our 2011 video Skype chat here.

J’Nell Jordan

“Warsan” Warsan Shire by J'Nell Jordan The Washington, D.C. area is still defining itself as a cultural hub for fine art. Fortunately, talented artists like J’Nell Jordan have already found their voice and are leading the way for this area’s creative growth. She supports several social causes with her art, as with this piece she donated in-kind to support our fundraiser in partnership with poet Warsan Shire. Her art is lively and energetic, capturing the lively, youthful party scene. Learn more about the artist’s inspiration and process here.

Brianna McCarthy

“Goldings VIII – XIII” Goldings VIII - XIII Ink and Gold Leaf 5 X 7 " TTD 900 - Brianna McCarthy How should we put it? Well, Brianna McCarthy is one of those artists where, it’s hard to separate where she ends and her art begins. If you follow her on instagram (which we highly recommend), you’ll see that she lives her life like a work of art, being and capturing the beauty and harmony in every moment. As a Caribbean woman, her art’s political message is important. McCarthy says: “Afro-Caribbean women have always been portrayed as strong, long-suffering, exoticised and picturesque beings against a backdrop of poverty, hardship, abuse and/or scorn. The range of emotional experience and expressions of our women in Caribbean art and culture have thus been limited to these circumstances.” We agree that narrow representations of Caribbean women become the repeated and dominant representations. Her work challenges  common, limiting ideas of gender, heritage and blackness with a uniquely beautiful aesthetic.

Noah Sow

“Readymade Spirituality Remix” Scroll over this interactive image to explore details You can bet there will always be a million pigeonholes people can’t wait to stuff you inside. As the lead singer for punk band Noiseaux, Noah Sow flips the bird to each and every one. When a reporter asked how it felt to be black, German and doing punk music, Noah replied: “I’m educated enough to know that ‘Black music’ is [many things]…you bet whenever I open my mouth to sing, what comes out is Black music by definition.” Now that this un-definiable, un-containable artist is expanding into fine visual art, you can bet, every work she creates is Black art, by definition. Sow describes her new installation as: “Mirroring numerous ways and incidents in which the global northwest’s conception of what is ‘mysterious’ is constituted by what its societies had first constructed as ‘other’. In this installation, The-Mysterious™ strikes back, challenging said paradigms then atomizing cultural appropriation. The supermarket of spirituality, the entire world a commodity for Europeans’ search of enlightenment and pastime. Sorry, we are closed. Fill in the blancs. Eat, pray, rucksack. The Alien Warrior gets a band aid. Ebay Jesus reversed. The gregorian choir is singing Unilever.” Learn more about this exceptional artist here. Written by Kathryn Buford

Share

Related Posts


30 Women Creators We Love Part V #30WCR8
30 Women Creators We Love Part V #30WCR8
#30wcr8, Women
30 Women Creators We Love Part IV #30WCR8
30 Women Creators We Love Part IV #30WCR8
#30wcr8, Live Unchained, Women
30 Women Creators We Love Part III #30WCR8
30 Women Creators We Love Part III #30WCR8
#30wcr8, Art, Graphic Design, poetry, Women

3 Comments


Trackbacks and Pingbacks

Leave a Comment


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>